Skip to main content

tv   The Papers  BBC News  April 15, 2019 11:30pm-12:00am BST

11:30 pm
welcome to newsday. i'm kasia madera in london. the headlines. “- ‘b ”in? m12 ‘0 probably eastern scotland. through the evening and overnight, that rain will continue to slow and fizzle one of the world's architectural wonders, notre dame cathedral in paris, gci’oss will continue to slow and fizzle across western scotland so the has been left in ruins by a devastating fire. weather should become drier overnight. temperatures, 4— seven these are the live pictures from the french capital, where it's been burning and there is a sign of clouds waking for nearly five hours. up and there is a sign of clouds waking up across central and eastern the blaze has destroyed much of the cathedral‘s roof. england, a sign of things to come on this is the moment the main spire of the 850—year—old building collapsed. i'm rico hizon in singapore. wednesday. wednesday is when winds also in the programme: fall light and we will see larger brea ks fall light and we will see larger breaks in the cloud so much more in president macron has the way of sunshine. it's the been to the scene. sunshine which makes all the he said it was sad to see difference. up to 18 in the what was a part of all french people south—east, 111 not too bad in burn — but it will be rebuilt. translation: the worst has been edinburgh, warmer still later in the avoided, even if the battle isn't won yet. week. thursday, if you mist and fog patches but for many of us, a decent thousands have been watching in tears and dismay as this symbol day. a bit of patchy cloud. not spoiling things too much. a much
11:31 pm
better day in belfast. we could see hires reaching 20 in cardiff. more of that warm weather. sunshine on the way. temperatures fairly widely climbing into the high teens, with the sunshine fairly widespread. 21 in edinburgh. in scotland, further south, into easter weekend, the threat of some weather systems working in of the atlantic, a bit of rain across the far north—west but through the weekend, fine for most of us. 20 degrees in glasgow. fine weather as well for belfast and newcastle as we start off the weekend. warm and sunny for england and wales on the weekend. a trend for the weather to turn unsettled. a closer look at the trends now
11:32 pm
because in the outlook, we may start to see low pressure system is moving m, to see low pressure system is moving in, bringing rain and cooler weather as well. there is a trend into next week for the weather to turn more u nsettled week for the weather to turn more unsettled with claudia, windy weather. the timing of that change is still uncertain. high pressure could last longer across eastern areas of the uk. hello. this is bbc news. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow mornings papers in a moment — first the headlines. one of the world's most famous landmarks, notre dame cathedral in paris, has been engulfed by fire.
11:33 pm
firefighters say the building's structure and its two main towers have been saved. but much of the roof has been destroyed and the main spire over the transept has collapsed. president emmanuel macron earlier visited the site and said in the last half hour — "we will rebuild". translation: the worst has been avoided, even if the battle is not yet one. —— won. and these are live pictures of the fire at the 850—year—old gothic building. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow.
11:34 pm
with me arejessica elgot, chief political correspondent at the guardian and steven swinford deputy political editor from the telegraph. many of tomorrow's front pages are already in. the guardian — like most — leads on the fire of notre dame, saying it could be linked to building work that was underway. the financial times is also focusing on the blaze — calling the cathedral one of france's best known structures and one of the most visited places in the world. the i dedicates its front page to a picture of notre dame's tower in flames — before it later collapsed. the telegraph shows a picture of the beloved cathedral over the river seine. it talks about the impact this has had on the people of paris. the metro, too, leads on the fire, with a picture of smoke billowing into the sky and crowds watching from a bridge over the river seine. the daily mail's front page is covered by a picture of the cathedral in flames — it talks of the history that has been lost. the sun writes "notre doom" — with a shot of the tower falling
11:35 pm
apart amongst the fire. and the times looks at the battle to save notre dame. and that is a quick look at what we have on our front pages. let's have a little more in terms of what is inside. the times, jessica, has a big right through here with that key image. at the end of this part of the front page they say that experts had been warning that the cathedral had been warning that the cathedral had been warning that the cathedral had been in poor condition for yea rs. had been in poor condition for years. yes. there clearly was a massive renovation ever going on and some people seem to say that may have been the cause of the fire. the times also details having visited the cathedral last year and that it was quite evident of the disrepair.
11:36 pm
there was a garden at the back full of ga rg oyles, there was a garden at the back full of gargoyles, stone and masonry. it had been cordoned off and some had been left to lay where they fell off. there is an enormous amount of work to be done restoring the cathedral anyway and a huge amount of skill needed. the skill needed to restore the stone, to restore stained—glass windows which may have been common skills or more common school centuries ago but are less common 110w school centuries ago but are less common now and take a lot of specialist effort. it will be a monumental effort to try and restore it. stephen, taking a step back. we have been covering this for the last few hours yet it is striking to see the emotion that has been unveiled all around the world and, of course, in paris. there has been extraordinary change in the last few hours. when we were reporting earlier and when these papers went off press it looked quite bleak, like it would burn to the ground and notre dame would be lost and people we re notre dame would be lost and people were talking in very mournful tones at that stage. but since the papers
11:37 pm
we nt at that stage. but since the papers went to press, emmanuel macron has come out and said that a significant amount of the building has been saved. the emerging story tonight is the heroic effort of the 400 firefighters who seem to have succeeded in tackling this blaze and saving a lot of what is a pressured building —— precious building. initially it did look quite sombre. we saw a very dramatic picture of the spire falling over and many people have tweeted, and i think some of the papers have picked it up as well, that it is horribly reminiscent of that awful event that took so many lives in new york, of 9/11, and yet, of course, luckily, we have not heard of any lives lost here. and that is extraordinarily lucky in a way. the iconic frontage of notre dame has been saved. it is
11:38 pm
still devastating to lose parts of the wooden roof which date back over 800 years, not the whole thing but parts of it. and this fire is more recent. it has been rebuilt and it can be rebuilt. i think you can take heart from some of that but you see it on people ‘s faces, the symbolism of what it means. but it may take decades to rebuild but the poignancy is not lost. moving to the guardian. the sense of that what will remain... do you think that some of the pages may have to be rewritten? because the story has moved a lot. they will be completely rewritten. what i am hearing is that several hundred people were in the cathedral when the fire broke out. they all got out unscathed and they all have stories to tell. amazing and at
11:39 pm
testa m e nt to stories to tell. amazing and at testament to the fact that the warning system works. notjust that, but most of the precious artefacts and artwork which includes some truly historic pieces, most of them got out during that period. the evacuation of both people and precious artefacts is one of the stories of tonight, i think.” precious artefacts is one of the stories of tonight, i think. i know online there was one person tweeting about the fact that there are replicas that have been done of the insight and that will help with the rebuilding. president macron announced he will launch a international fundraising appeal. will that get support? notre dame is an iconic base notjust for christians or for french people but for people around the world. it is a popular visiting spot and anyone who has ever gone and sat in their, be they religious or not, will know that it they religious or not, will know thatitis they religious or not, will know that it is a special kind of place. and it has moved many people. the beauty of the interior, particularly
11:40 pm
the stained windows that were inside, that probably will encourage many inside, that probably will encourage ma ny efforts inside, that probably will encourage many efforts towards funding a rebuild. the daily mail front page. nine centuries of history lost to the unholy inferno. it is amazing that this happened in easter week, one of the most weeks for christians around the world. the timing is extraordinary and that is what shocked people. we're looking at stories from the streets of paris people were crying, people were praying and people were quite upset oi'i praying and people were quite upset on the streets of paris and that is one of the amazing things about tonight. 0ne one of the amazing things about tonight. one thing that may happen, looking at the coverage from the times earlier on, the experts wanted more money. they cost 150 million euros to restore and they only received 40 million euros. i don't think that money will be an issue any longer. and what does this mean for historic welding is in this country? parliament is falling to
11:41 pm
pieces, water is falling through the roof, isn't there? and it is a huge fire risk. every day there are people patrolling, looking to put out fire. and they find small fire regularly that they need to put out. and this is possibly a moment for us to ta ke and this is possibly a moment for us to take stock. they find small fires regularly?! we had a lead on it a few years ago. they need to put out small electrical fires. few years ago. they need to put out small electricalfires. i few years ago. they need to put out small electrical fires. i think the last was in 2012. it could have caused a huge fire except that it was identified quickly because the palace of westminster needs to have fire wardens patrolling the building regularly to find these small fires. this is a reminder to us, we have so many precious buildings in this country, how much do we need to treasure them and look after them?
11:42 pm
the daily mail is focusing on the history. learned about the notre dame at school, you go to paris and it dominates the skyline. everyone assumes it will be there for ever. what does this mean politically full president macron? politically for president macron. politically for president macroni think he definitely struck the right tone tonight. he said in a tweed early on the part of us is burning tonight and he is been quite statesmanlike in his addresses on television since. there is a contrast between the way international leaders have responded. he has been poetic whereas donald trump was focused on practicalities. he suggested dropping loads of water from planes which caused consternation from the french fire service. the french said
11:43 pm
that that was not a good idea because it might actually tumble the structure down. we were wondering why but there is obviously a very good reason why there were no helicopter as there. we are all looking to hear from helicopter as there. we are all looking to hearfrom emmanuel macron. this give a day or two of breathing space? it is difficult to say are difficult to predict how the fallout from this will play for him. 0bviously at a time of national tragedy. we say national tragedy and it is upsetting to watch for all of us, i think. it is upsetting to watch for all of us, ithink. and it is upsetting to watch for all of us, i think. and yet, it is upsetting to watch for all of us, ithink. and yet, this it is upsetting to watch for all of us, i think. and yet, this isjust a building, not lives. in a newsroom normally we deal with loss of human life. it is very hard to work out where we feel an emotional connection. is it familiarity? it is
11:44 pm
embedded in psychology. everyone goes up and knows this building. it resonates around the world. just in a visual sense. it's spiritual place in society as well. this is one of the most significant catholic cathedrals in the world. the daily telegraph, your paper says that paris weeps for its beloved lady. they call it the beloved lady. 0ur ladies the in france to this. it is so ladies the in france to this. it is so deep in the psychology of france, there are few buildings that have such an important national resonance in the world and this is one of them. one presumed say that people are ina them. one presumed say that people are in a state of shock, almost like are in a state of shock, almost like a cultural september 11. is that overstating it? people have to use their own ways to describe their own strong emotions and i do not wish to criticise anyone emotional about this but seeing some of the faces of
11:45 pm
the people standing around the cathedral, it is almost as moving are seeing the images of the fire. people chanting ave maria. there was a report of one fireman injured, let's hope that he is not too bad and let's hope we do not hear of any human loss of life andi not hear of any human loss of life and i hope that the structure can be rebuilt and any remaining flames quelled. let's move on now to a few other stories on the front pages. the guardian has alarm as study shows micro plastics around the world. there was a huge protest in london, rightly the bbc, jessica, this is your paper. it is an extraordinary story. the study has
11:46 pm
found that micro plastics are raining down even in the most remote pieces on earth because they have been whipped up by the wind and the wind has the capacity to carry this pollution everywhere. so places in the pyrenees, in the galapagos islands, and farms in china, farfar away from where you would expect to find pieces of plastic. it also suggests that people and animals are co nsta ntly suggests that people and animals are constantly consuming these micro plastics and the potential health effect of that are unknown. we don't know what it does to us to consume small quantities of plastic every day. this story is a wake—up call and a shocker. know i was there are there's been a massive
11:47 pm
wake—up call. was there are there's been a massive wake-up call. the guardian of the telegraph takes it seriously. all of the national newspapers take seriously. there is a quote in here from steve allen and he says, obviously we don't know the health impact of these micro plastics. he says if it's going to be a problem, it's going to be a very big problem. i don't think there is an organism on earth that is immune to this. researchers just don't know we may not know for some time. we can't escape talking of another great unknown. whether the b word will ever be resolved. jessica, the telegraph ‘s got a story down the bottom. no deal planning must continue. that is still on the cards, isn't it? yes, it's still on the cards. i think it's become extraordinarily unlikely, given the events of the past few weeks. i
11:48 pm
might have put no deal is one of the most likely scenarios. the way that mps have managed to take care of it. the timetable, how the house of commons works. the only circumstances when no deal look like a prospect. you've both been speaking to both parties in terms of how these cross—party talks are progressing. i've been talking to people on the government side, one minister told me it's extremely unlikely to result in anything. people are feeling it's inevitable that we are going to take part in european elections which is one of the most crazy statements i've ever had to make. we are supposed to be leaving the european union but we are taking part in elections that no—one seems to want. are taking part in elections that no-one seems to want. is a bigger problem for the tories than labour.
11:49 pm
it's basically a programme of convoluted talks on workers' rights and security. the main thing they are not agreeing on customs union. labour honest, they don't want to really be sent to walk away from the talks. it would probably be the government. i think you know what we want. is theresa may not going make the decision to move on her redlines and accept the kind of customs union that labour wants theresa may is on a walking holiday. is she safe? she might have a lot longer than people
11:50 pm
think. there is no mechanism at the moment. come december, there is a mechanism. it's a very, very big field. philip hammond said it's a much widerfield field. philip hammond said it's a much wider field and he's field. philip hammond said it's a much widerfield and he's right about that. people like boris johnson, jeremy hunt, dominic raab. outsiders like james cleve rley. johnson, jeremy hunt, dominic raab. outsiders like james cleverley. if it goes to the tory electorate? i don't know, there is a big moderate rump of one nation tories and a lot of them are not exited —— exit supporters. and keeping labour together is extremely difficult. supporters. and keeping labour together is extremely difficultlj think together is extremely difficult.” think it's easier to keep labour together. over this particular issue because jeremy corbyn together. over this particular issue becausejeremy corbyn is effectively budging the second referendum
11:51 pm
question. i think is mps know that he is. is there going to be something apartment they can vote on it's not clear that it would. if enough toys become dissatisfied but the main problem for the people who wa nt to the main problem for the people who want to second referendum, they don't have enough support in the conservative party to get a parliamentary majority. jessica and stephen, thank you both very much indeed. can't resist a little bit of politics but tonight's focus has been on paris. that is it for the papers. don't forget you can see the front pages of the papers online on the bbc news website. it's all there for you — 7 days a week at bbc.co.uk/papers. and if you miss the programme any evening you can watch it later on bbc iplayer. thank you, jessica elgot
11:52 pm
and steven swinford. let's get the latest sport now. in the premier league — arsenal have moved up to 4th, after a 1—0 win at watford. it's the first time they've kept a clean sheet away from home this season. the home side got off to the worst possible start. this mistake from keeper ben foster, allowing arsenal's top scorer pierre emerick aubameyang to score inside the first 10 minutes. a minute later — and with emotions running high, troy deeney, watford's captain was sent off. he appeared to elbow arsenal midfielder lucas torreira — and was given a straight red, much to his bemusement. 1—0 it finished to arsenal. they're now a point off spurs, who sit 3rd. watford miss the chance to go 7th.
11:53 pm
he is going to give us a lot of information this march. our analysis from this match, take a confidence, good positioning. a lot of things, we wa nted good positioning. a lot of things, we wanted today. manchester united have arrived at the nou camp — ahead of their champions league quarter final against barcelona tomorrow night.united are trailing 1—0 after the first leg. both alexis sanchez and nemanja matic travelled with the squad, after missing out on last week's tie. for barcelona, lionel messi is fit to play after he was rested at the weekend. we know the ties for the last 16 of rugby league's challenge cup. 12 time winners st helens werejoined by the remaining 8 super league clubs — and the winners of the eight 5th round ties. former st helens duo paul sculthorpe and jon wilkin — who were members of the last saints side to lift the trophy in 2008 helped to conduct the draw on bbc sport. this is how it looks, the defending champions — the catalans dragons,
11:54 pm
face league 1's doncaster. warrington are at home to wigan and st helens face huddesfield as well as hull hosting castleford. all—superleague encounters there. leeds rhinos, the superleague's bottom side, travel to 5 time winners bradford bulls of the championship. shaun edwards will not return to rugby league, to become head coach at wigan warriors the wales rugby union defence coach verbally agreed a three year deal at the club where he played for 15 years, winning every honour. edwards says he's not experienced enough for the role and will stay with wales. australia's rugby union head coach — michael cheika — says israel folau's disrespectful social media comments would make it impossible for him to be picked for this year's rugby world cup. the full—back, who was tipped to star at the torunament —— tournament in the autumn, and has 73 caps for the wallabies, has had his contract terminated following a social media post which stated "hell awaits" gay people. he has 48 hours to accept his sacking, orface a code of conduct hearing. speaking yesterday —
11:55 pm
folau said his christian faith must come before his rugby union career. earlier this evening — billy vunipola the saracens and england number 8, who had liked folau's post on social media, has been formally warned by his club for what they call a serious error ofjudgement. he says his intention was never to cause suffering. the rfu are also expected to speak to vunipola this week. olympic champion adam peaty has ruled out going for two individual gold medals, at the tokyo olympics next year. there had been talk that he would race in the 200m, but instead he'll now focus on defending his 100m breaststroke title. because i want to focus on pushing the boundaries on the 100 and pushing the boundaries on the 50, it creates too much of a gap in too much of a whole if i tried to do the 200 as well because it's a com pletely 200 as well because it's a completely different architecture of race and body shape and everything. they are all kind of skinny and long, the stroke ‘s, i am completely
11:56 pm
opposite, mostly with a short stroked so to do all three would require a lot of different techniques i don't even think would be possible. the weather is going to change significantly in the run—up to easter because we are changing where our weather is coming from, changing wind direction, temperature is at best around 12 degrees. look what happens over the next few days. it really warms up across central parts of europe. that's where we're going to get coming from. mid 20s by the easter weekend. monday, to get coming from. mid 20s by the easterweekend. monday, it wasn't to get coming from. mid 20s by the easter weekend. monday, it wasn't a bad start of the week. this band of cloud sitting out to the west
11:57 pm
ringing patchy rain. it's moving very, very slowly eastwards. very windy across the far south—west. it won't be as windy. the clear skies will have filled in. temperatures around five or six degrees. the rain becoming lighter and more patchy. eastern areas of scotland and england, the best of the sunshine towards the east coast although should get some we still have breeze of the north sea for the north—east of the north sea for the north—east of england. temperatures ten, 12 degrees. there is more sunshine on the way. wales, the west midlands.
11:58 pm
some patchy cloud around. showers all the way through the meese —— the east midlands. more sunshine beginning to warm up. continuing to rise over the following few days. everywhere will see temperatures climbing, probably the peak of the warmth will be on saturday, 21125, before things turn cooler later on.
11:59 pm
12:00 am

0 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on